News

New surgeon joins Northfield Hospital

Dr Katya Ericson 2014General surgeon Katya Ericson, MD, is joining Surgical Care Consultants, P.A., a general surgery practice that serves both Northfield Hospital & Clinics and Allina Medical Clinic.

A graduate of the University of Minnesota Medical School, Dr. Ericson comes to Northfield from Hennepin County Medical Center, where she recently completed a five-year residency in general surgery. She will work closely with Jose Fulco, MD, and Chris Nielsen, MD. Read more »

Hospital offers room service dining

Patients at Northfield Hospital now have the option of ordering meals from a restaurant-style menu anytime between 7 a.m. and 6 p.m. Hot, freshly-prepared food is delivered to their rooms within 45 minutes.

This new program provides a more patient-centered experience for those who stay at Northfield Hospital. Patients will be able to choose from a wide variety of items and not be bound by standard meal times. Specially trained Nutrition Services personnel will assist patients with menu selections to ensure meals comply with physician diet orders.

Patients have breakfast, lunch or dinner available to them any time during the 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. window. Breakfast options include scrambled eggs, omelets to order, cereals, fruit, bread and pastries. Lunch and dinner options include salads, soups, build-a-sandwich, hamburgers, turkey burgers and other grill items, roast pork, roast turkey, stir-fry or an herbed chicken breast. There are also provisions for low sodium, heart healthy, diabetic and liquid diets.

Elizabeth Berry, director of Nutrition Services at Northfield Hospital & Clinics, says room service dining puts patients’ needs first and honors their individual circumstances and preferences.

 “When you are hospitalized and not feeling well, you aren’t always hungry at traditional meal times,” Berry said. “This gives patients an element of control and allows them to eat when they are hungry, on their own time table.”

 

Heart Safe is gaining ground

Nine months after launching a community-wide, “hands only” CPR training for bystanders, Northfield Heart Safe Project  has given more than 1,200 community members the tools they need to act quickly in an emergency. They have learned the signs and symptoms of stroke, heart attack and sudden cardiac arrest, and they have been trained in “No Fear, Compressions Only” CPR and AED protocol.

Kathy Hanek, an EMT and coordinator of Northfield Area Heart Safe Project, said this program will save lives. Nationally, sudden cardiac arrests claim 300,000 people annually. Kathy is convinced the odds will improve if people are trained to act in an emergency.

Read more »

Make spring screening part of your spring ritual

spring fling-mammo flier 2014Northfield Hospital’s Breast Care Center is inviting women to combine an important Spring Screening with their seasonal Spring Cleaning.

Those who schedule mammograms the week of May 19 will receive a complementary Gerbera daisy. For an appointment, call 507-646-1143.

Early detection of breast cancer is known to save lives and increase treatment options. The American Cancer Society recommends annual mammogram screenings beginning at age 40 for women at average risk of breast cancer.

Sandy Mulford, Director of Diagnostic Imaging at Northfield Hospital, said the “Spring Screening” is an effort to encourage women to have their annual mammogram.

“It’s easy to remember the importance of annual mammography during Breast Cancer Awareness Month in October, but this important screening can be tended to year-round,” said Mulford..

All mammography exams are performed on a direct digital system, utilizing advanced Computer Aided Diagnosis (CAD) software and skilled radiologist interpretation. Patients benefit from a padded mammogram table that makes the screening as comfortable as possible, and from supportive, experienced technologists who have specialty certification specific to mammography.

Pediatric allergist practicing in Lakeville

Dr Nancy OttNancy Ott, MD, a pediatric allergist from Mayo Clinic, is now seeing patients at FamilyHealth Medical Clinic in Lakeville.

Dr. Ott practiced at Southdale Pediatrics for 22 years before moving to Mayo Clinic last year to add teaching and research to her practice. Her services are provided by Mayo Clinic Outreach.

Dr. Ott personal experience with childhood asthma has informed her work as a pediatric allergist.  At age 13, she spent nine months at National Jewish Hospital in Denver, Colorado, for asthma treatment.

“That’s what sparked my interest in medicine,” she said. “I had terrible asthma growing up in rural North Dakota.” Read more »

Northfield Police Reserves wanted

Ever thought about being a police reserve officer? The Northfield Police Department is looking for
a few good women and men to step up to the plate and join our department.
Training and uniforms provided. Application and job description can be found on
the city website under job opportunities. The deadline is April 29 at 4 pm.

City of Northfield – Police Reserves

 

Volunteers key to book fair success

bookfair2014How many Northfielders does it take to hold a book fair?
A lot.

That’s what Carolyn Sanford and Kathy Tezla, this year’s co-chairs of the Northfield Hospital Auxiliary’s Great Northfield, Minn. Book Raid, have discovered.

Since stepping forward to coordinate the auxiliary’s 53rd annual event, April 22-26, at the Northfield Ice Arena, they have been overwhelmed by the number of people and the flood of goodwill that surrounds this all-volunteer undertaking.

“We are simply amazed and delighted to see the energy and enthusiasm this community has for this event,” said Carolyn Sanford, a retired Carleton College librarian. “As new co-chairs, we are learning as we go, but all of the ‘helping hands’ make this a great experience.” Read more »

April is Occupational Therapy Month!

Each year in April, occupational therapists, occupational therapy assistants, and students in practice, education, research, and science host a month long celebration showcasing the importance of Occupational Therapy. It’s the time of year when everyone in the profession goes out of their way to tell the world about what we do. But promoting our profession is not just an April job.

Book sale donations begin April 6

The Northfield Hospital Auxiliary will hold its 53rd annual Great Northfield, Minnesota Book Raid Tuesday, April 22, through Saturday, April 26, at the Northfield Ice Arena, and it needs your books.

Donations of books, DVDs and CDs can be made at the ice arena, beginning Sunday, April 6. Hours are 1 to 4 p.m. Sunday, April 6; 9 to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday, April 7-11; 10 to 2 p.m. Saturday, April 12; 9 to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday, April 14-18; and 9 to noon Saturday, April 19.

The sale, itself, begins at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, April 22. Sale hours will be 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. on Tuesday; 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. on Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, April 23 – April 25; and 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday, April 26. Friday all books are 50 percent off. Saturday morning is the bag sale ($5 per bag) from 8 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. From 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. all remaining books are free.

Over the years the book fair has raised more than three quarters of a million dollars. It is used to support projects at Northfield Hospital & Clinics and other community health initiatives. This year, the hospital auxiliary is dedicating funds raised from the book fair to the expanded Cancer Care & Infusion Center at Northfield Hospital.

Northfield Hospital recognized for reducing early elective deliveries

Northfield Hospital’s First Touch Birth Center was recently recognized by the March of Dimes and Minnesota Hospital Association (MHA) for its commitment to reducing early elective deliveries.

Research shows that important development takes place for a baby’s brain and lungs during the last few weeks of pregnancy. Yet according to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), early elective deliveries — which include inductions and planned Cesarean sections that are not medically necessary — still account for 10 to 15 percent of all deliveries nationally.

Hospitals in Minnesota and across the nation are working to end elective deliveries prior to 39 weeks gestation. Minnesota passed a law in 2012 requiring hospitals to implement policies and processes to minimize non-medically necessary early inductions. Northfield Hospital was one of 35 Minnesota hospitals recognized by MHA’s Partnership for Patients program for reducing the rate of early elective deliveries to 5 percent or less in 2013.

Annette Sheldon, RN, director of First Touch Birth at Northfield Hospital, said the birth center has had such a policy in place for almost 10 years.

Last year, 548 babies were delivered at Northfield Hospital. None of these were scheduled for an induction or Cesarean birth before 39 weeks without a medical indication.

“Occasionally women may request early elective deliveries for social reasons or because they are uncomfortable,” Sheldon said. “However, we find that when they are made aware of the data showing that babies have fewer complications when they are born after 39 weeks, they are usually happy to wait.”

Sheldon said babies born electively before 39 weeks are more likely to have breathing issues, difficulty feeding, and jaundice, and they may have a longer hospital stay.

Through its Partnership for Patients program, Minnesota Hospital Association provides education and technical assistance for members to improve on quality health care initiatives and foster a culture of safety in Minnesota hospitals.

For more information or questions, go to: http://www.mnhospitals.org/patient-safety/partnership-for-patients.

 

 

 

 

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