Welcome to Northfield Hospital & Clinics

Northfield Hospital & Clinics provides a wide spectrum of medical services to residents of Rice, Dakota, Scott and Goodhue counties. Combining advanced technology with personalized, patient-centered care, we strive to create a healing environment where patients feel safe, secure and supported.

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News Center

Hospital offers room service dining

Patients at Northfield Hospital now have the option of ordering meals from a restaurant-style menu anytime between 7 a.m. and 6 p.m. Hot, freshly-prepared food is delivered to their rooms within 45 minutes.

This new program provides a more patient-centered experience for those who stay at Northfield Hospital. Patients will be able to choose from a wide variety of items and not be bound by standard meal times. Specially trained Nutrition Services personnel will assist patients with menu selections to ensure meals comply with physician diet orders.

Patients have breakfast, lunch or dinner available to them any time during the 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. window. Breakfast options include scrambled eggs, omelets to order, cereals, fruit, bread and pastries. Lunch and dinner options include salads, soups, build-a-sandwich, hamburgers, turkey burgers and other grill items, roast pork, roast turkey, stir-fry or an herbed chicken breast. There are also provisions for low sodium, heart healthy, diabetic and liquid diets.

Elizabeth Berry, director of Nutrition Services at Northfield Hospital & Clinics, says room service dining puts patients’ needs first and honors their individual circumstances and preferences.

 “When you are hospitalized and not feeling well, you aren’t always hungry at traditional meal times,” Berry said. “This gives patients an element of control and allows them to eat when they are hungry, on their own time table.”

 

Heart Safe is gaining ground

Nine months after launching a community-wide, “hands only” CPR training for bystanders, Northfield Heart Safe Project  has given more than 1,200 community members the tools they need to act quickly in an emergency. They have learned the signs and symptoms of stroke, heart attack and sudden cardiac arrest, and they have been trained in “No Fear, Compressions Only” CPR and AED protocol.

Kathy Hanek, an EMT and coordinator of Northfield Area Heart Safe Project, said this program will save lives. Nationally, sudden cardiac arrests claim 300,000 people annually. Kathy is convinced the odds will improve if people are trained to act in an emergency.

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Make spring screening part of your spring ritual

spring fling-mammo flier 2014Northfield Hospital’s Breast Care Center is inviting women to combine an important Spring Screening with their seasonal Spring Cleaning.

Those who schedule mammograms the week of May 19 will receive a complementary Gerbera daisy. For an appointment, call 507-646-1143.

Early detection of breast cancer is known to save lives and increase treatment options. The American Cancer Society recommends annual mammogram screenings beginning at age 40 for women at average risk of breast cancer.

Sandy Mulford, Director of Diagnostic Imaging at Northfield Hospital, said the “Spring Screening” is an effort to encourage women to have their annual mammogram.

“It’s easy to remember the importance of annual mammography during Breast Cancer Awareness Month in October, but this important screening can be tended to year-round,” said Mulford..

All mammography exams are performed on a direct digital system, utilizing advanced Computer Aided Diagnosis (CAD) software and skilled radiologist interpretation. Patients benefit from a padded mammogram table that makes the screening as comfortable as possible, and from supportive, experienced technologists who have specialty certification specific to mammography.

Pediatric allergist practicing in Lakeville

Dr Nancy OttNancy Ott, MD, a pediatric allergist from Mayo Clinic, is now seeing patients at FamilyHealth Medical Clinic in Lakeville.

Dr. Ott practiced at Southdale Pediatrics for 22 years before moving to Mayo Clinic last year to add teaching and research to her practice. Her services are provided by Mayo Clinic Outreach.

Dr. Ott personal experience with childhood asthma has informed her work as a pediatric allergist.  At age 13, she spent nine months at National Jewish Hospital in Denver, Colorado, for asthma treatment.

“That’s what sparked my interest in medicine,” she said. “I had terrible asthma growing up in rural North Dakota.” More »

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